No More Straws in Our Lunches?

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No More Straws in Our Lunches?

Sommer Sechang, Staff Writer

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Plastic straws will no longer be included in cafeteria spork kits. 

 

The change was expected to begin on September 23, but the cafeteria has yet to make the adjustment. 

 

Last year Nataly Garcia, now a senior, proposed that plastic straws should be omitted from school lunches in order to be environmentally friendly. 

 

“There was hardly any action taken. [The school] said they could advertise for people to throw away their trash but they can’t remove the straws. They offered an alternative that would separate the straws from the sporks and people can just grab what they want, but they can’t do this until they get approval from the district.”

 

The district’s nutritionist, Mr. Craig Pulsipher, took interest in what she had to say and decided to take action. 

 

“There is a lot of plastic packaging and other plastic waste as a result of foodservice within our school district. This will be the start of a movement that will eventually result in many environmentally friendly changes in how we prepare and serve food to students.”

 

Although many students agree with the course of change, some believe it will negatively impact the way they enjoy their lunch. 

 

“I need the straws because I don’t like to drink from the carton with my lips,” complains Demi Mendoza, a senior.

 

Others find the straws necessary on rare occasions.

 

“Drinking straight from the cartons is okay most of the time but sometimes the carton gets messed up so it’s quite an annoyance and you need a straw,” adds senior Bianca Uriostegui.

 

On the other hand, some are livid and do not see the straws as a problem.

 

“I find that irrational and doltish because just by removing straws does not mean we will improve our environment by a lot. I think that the major waste in our school is paper because if you were to look at the copy machines of the teachers when they go, you would see tons of paper that is thrown away. Like I would rather focus on our paper than our straws, leave our straws alone,” criticizes Aurora Duarte, a senior.

 

Some feel that, out of all the waste produced by lunch, straws are the least of their worries.

 

“I don’t really think the straws are that big of a problem under the effects of the trays literally being everywhere and the napkins and the packaging of some of the food,” senior Demi Mendoza adds.

 

Another proposes that straws shouldn’t be the only thing students could ask for.

 

“I think we should ask for forks or spoons because sometimes I don’t use them and I just throw them away. That’s just a waste of plastic,” suggests senior Raquel Calderon-Rodriguez.

 

Our custodian, Mr. Pedro Castillo, believes the elimination of straws won’t improve the overall waste production of the school, but “it would help make the school look better [to the public].”

 

For now, the change will only affect Moreno Valley High School. If there is positive feedback, the removal of straws will expand to cafeterias district-wide.